ClipGrab – Free Utility – Downloads YouTube Video/Audio – No Bullshit

ClipGrab downloads assets (audio and video) from youtube (and other services, but I haven’t tried others yet). If you use it, please donate to the dude that made it.

I’m working on a project that invloves sampling corporate industrial videos from YouTube. I used to use KeepVid for downloading YouTube files, but it doesn’t really work anymore, or at least, it sucks now and requires jumping through hoops to get working. Sorry, KeepVid :(

I was about to give up and use my machine’s headphone jack to send audio to another device to record, but I really didn’t want to do that because of the potential loss in quality caused by two additional stages of digital/analog conversion, not to mention the fact that doing it that way is a real-time process.

After hours of searching and trying tons of sucky browser extensions, hoping to find a KeepVid alternative, I finally found something that works. Thank you, ClipGrab! I was getting so frustrated.

ClipGrab is an app, not a browser extension. I’m using a Mac with El Capitan atm, but there are also versions for Windows & Linux, as well as Mac OS Lion, Mountain Lion, and ‘older versions of Mac OS,’ which I assume means you can use ClipGrab to download Youtube files even with an older Mac running Snow Leopard! (I’ll try it on my old mac soon).

 

How to use ClipGrab:

After installation, you just paste in a URL where the video you’re after is. Then select which assets you want to download and the version (quality).

Some notes borrowed from the ClipGrab FAQ about supported video sites:

YouTube – Videos can be downloaded in HD (1080p und 720p) as well as in standard definition (480p, 360p and 240p).Additionally, ClipGrab provides an integrated and easy-to-use search function for YouTube videos.

Vimeo – Vimeo is another popular video platform, specializing in high-quality and artistic videos.
Vimeo is always featuring amazing videos and also offers a big selection of Creative Commons videos. From Vimeo, videos can be downloaded in HD or standard definition.

Dailymotion – Dailymotion is another video website with top-tier support by ClipGrab. Videos from Dailymotion can be downloaded in HD, high and low quality standard definition.

Facebook – The widely popular social network is becoming and ever more important platform for sharing videos. You can easily download Facebook videos including private ones with ClipGrab.

Other sites – If a site isn’t “officially” supported by ClipGrab, you might still be able to download videos from it. Through an advanced video-recognition system, ClipGrab allows the download from thousands of websites even if they are not listed

You should definitely donate to ClipGrab if you canNot only is this the most hassle free way I have found to download audio and video from YouTube and other sites, but the ClipGrab website is also super clean and friendly with no popups, ads, or other bullshit. Just download the app and you’re on you’re way. You can donate any amount via PayPal or Bitcoin.

ClipGrab is so rad, I’ve given it “Keep in Dock” status, which is one of the highest honors an application gets around here –The equivelant of Knighthood for an app. I dub thee Sir ClipGrab :)

The Best Ecommerce Solution for Artists

Crowdfunding is an obvious need for undiscovered artists and creative type people.  It’s hard to put musicians, photographers and software developers in the same box, but when it comes to E-commerce, there are some obvious common threads.

There are projects that us small time creators just can’t do without a garuntee of cost offset.  If we know we have a certain amount of support from our community, we can do bigger and better things!

Crowdfunding is growing in popularity, and since I am a long-time supporter of the democratization of virtually everything, I have always been interested in trends related to crowdfunding and other non-gatekeeper models.

I recently experimented with selling an album (mp3 320) via a common WordPress ecommerce plugin, and was trying to make the transaction pay-what-you-want, but I had a hard time editing the checkout process.  It was just really hard for me to find where in the plugin I was using to patch/hack the checkout form to do what I wanted:

  • Pay What You Want (even nothing)
  • Collect emails
  • Gracefully redirect back to my site (from PayPal or other payment gateway) after opting to pay (One of the biggest problems I had is dealing with payments of $0, because the forms for ecommerce usually assume a value, and redirection happens after purchase… but then, what about the email collection and redirection to a thanks page?!)

The real value to me here is the email address, not the payment, which I can only expect to be a few bucks here and there at this point, since I’m not super famous (yet).  But building a fan-base, if I can do that, is very valuable.

What I’d like to be able to do is easily set up, both things for sale, like mp3’s, and also, take pre-orders for things I’m working on. It’d be great if people like myself had an easy way to paywall content or allow paid subscriptions to certain pages or downloads on my site. And it’d be very cool if I had crowdfunding abilities.  As far as I know, this is not an open-source or turnkey possibility. But stay optimistic!  Things are moving fast in these spaces.

I hope all this stuff gets easier for Creatives soon.  Let’s overthrow that gatekeeper legacy we hate so much!

I will do my best to update this if I get new info!  Comments welcome as usual.

 

 

Thoughts on Inexpensive Stereo Reference Monitoring

All of the following refers only to STEREO mixing.
Also, if I use the term “2.1” I’m referring to stereo plus monoized sub. It should be noted that in reality, “real” 2.1 is actually more complicated than that. Real 2.1 decodes the source material in more sophisticated ways, depending on the material. But for our purposes, 2.1 means left plus right plus a monoized bass signal.

Here are some main points.

  • Powered monitors that have individual volume controls are a pain cuz they need to be calibrated unless you leave them all the way up, which is a different pain (turning on/off or noise when unplugging etc).
  • Powered moniters kind of suck because when one goes out, youre out the whole setup, which is why I’ve decided it’s better to use an amp and 2 passive speakers
  • No matter what, you’re blind if you don’t have a subwoofer.
  • I can defintely say that 8 inch speakers sound more real than 5 inch
  • I can definitely say that not having a sub is worse than anything
  • the second area where you’re most likely to be blind, is the crisp/shrill (i’d say everything above 5 or 8k) area of highs, followed by the muddy area of low mids (i’d say between 150 and 300) (maybe why 8s are better than 5s)
  • 2-way speakers are definately more reliable than 3-ways or 4-ways… One low driver and one tweeter. If there was such a thing as a driver that could reproduce everthing from ~100hz all the way up to ~12kHz or higher, that’d be the way to go. Basically, monitors have “crossovers” which send highs to the tweeter and lows to the woofer. The crossovers are never perfect so the fewer crossovers the better.
  • I’ve found that “coaxial” 2-ways are better than the typical setup where the tweeter is above the woofer. I think I can detect the difference in location so if the tweeter is in the middle of the woofer, it seems to all be coming from one place. Unfortunately, not many manufacturers make inexpensive coaxial monitors.
  • it’s important to remember that the room you’re in has almost as much to do with what you hear as the speakers. REALLY.
  • amplifier quality is pretty much a non-issue nowadays. Even very cheap amps are very faithful, especially when considering how volatile the speakers and room are as factors.
  • Powered speakers that have their own USB digital to analogue converter: why deal with another layer of bullshit? The mac you’re using has a great sound card! Switching audio outputs in system prefs and in program prefs is a workflow bitch when going from speakers to headphones Etc. Plus, latency! Whenever possible, use the computer soundcard, unless you have some sort of interface that has less latency, which I doubt you do.
  • The fewer components to hook up the better

If money was no object:

  • a good room
  • 2 coaxial 2-way speakers L and R
  • 2 subs L and R
  • Amps for each speaker
  • Crossover adjustment for the subs

Since money is an object

  • A monoized signal for the sub-bass is an ok compromise, since it is true that it’s nearly impossible to tell where the hell in your room the sub is, AND a lot, if not most audio material is mastered to have a monoized low end and since we’re cheap bastards, whom may want to skimp on mastering costs, it may even be smart to just work under the pretense that sub-bass is mono or at least ‘mono-compatible’ meaning there’s no significant phase cancellation in the low end that will cause volume changes when the low end is monoized by someone else’s stupid 2.1 setup.
  • So this means what we’re after on a budget is a 2.1 system. The single sub takes the left and right signal and actively mixes them together (actively as in via a mixer, not a y-cable)

My setup is 2 speakers, mixer, L/R amp, powered Sub.

  • soundcard to mixer.
  • mixer L and R to amp for L/R monitors
  • Mixer mono post-fader send out to powered Sub (post fader so channel volume effects L, R and Sub… In reality, there’s a thing called the “Fletcher-Munsen Curves” which means that bass is not proportianal to highs the same way at every volume level, but for practical purposes, within a typical listening range, I can calibrate the bass to the L/R once and go a little louder or quieter without being too far off) …So I have one volume level which controls everything.

Problem with my setup: Too many components!

If I was going to start over and keep it cheap, I’d buy a consumer-grade 2.1 system and toss the L/R speakers that came with it and instead, use my high-end coaxial 2-ways for the L/R. The 2.1 system would have a sub crossover frequency adjustment and a sub volume and a master volume. Then I’d have:

  • 3 pieces: sub containing all three amps, a Left passive monitor, a Right passive Monitor
  • one stereo mini going from the computer to the sub, where the L/R amps and the Sub amp is housed, and 2 speaker wires going to my L/R monitors.
  • NOTE: The L/R Monitors are where the money is spent!  If the 2.1 Amp/Sub bullshit dies, toss it and get a new one.

Finally

I really think you should have at LEAST a hundred watts of power for the sub!!  Meanwhile I think you can get away with far less for L/R… Maybe even as low as Twenty Watts!  But it also depends on how efficient the amplifiers are… And since we’re trying to get all three amps and a sub in one unit, we’re essentially shopping for bass power.  The L/R will be plenty.

Reason Fader Level in dB 100=0dB so what is -3dB Etc? The Answer?

Been frustrated that Propellerhead Reason’s Meters and Faders do not use the standard dB measurement.  Instead the faders are just 0-127 (likely an artifact of MIDI), and the meters are just color-coded.

The following is something I found here after some digging.  It wasn’t easy to find so I’m re-posting it here.  This is plagiarism.  But I’m stealing bread to feed you hungry fellow frustrated and confused music producers out there.

I haven’t completely fact-checked this.  I’ll update in the next  few weeks if I find this info to be inaccurate.

[begin plagiarism]

WARNING: too much information mode = ON
(do I have a lot of time on my hands or what?!?)

Mixer Faders (and Master Fader) are Unity at 100 (or -7dB from clipping)

Mixer Fader (1-127) levels to dB:
127 = 0dB
123 = -1dB
119 = -2dB
115 = -3dB
111 = -4dB
106 = -5dB
104 = -6dB
100 = -7dB
97 = -8dB
93 = -9dB
83 = -12dB
72 = -15dB
64 = -18dB

What’s weird is that the NN-19 sampler levels don’t match these. They are:
127 = 0dB
123 = -3dB
112 = -6dB
100 = -9dB

Mixer Sends are Unity at:
Mono send = 79
Stereo send = 100
(since sereo aux sends follow channel panning, when panned hard left or right unity is at a send level of 79)

Mixer Meters: (from top to bottom)
(all levels rounded to nearest 0.5dB)
Top ‘LED’ (orange) = -1dB
2nd (orange) = -3.5dB
3rd (orange) = -6.0dB
4th (orange) = -8.5dB
5th (yellow) = -10.5dB
6th (yellow) = -13.0dB
7th (yellow) = -15.5dB
8th (yellow) = -17.5dB
9th (green) = -20.0dB
10th (green) = -22.5dB
11th (green) = -25.0dB
12th (green) = -27.3dB
13th (green) = -29.5dB
14th (green) = -32.0dB
15th (green) = -34.5dB
16th (green) = -36.5dB
17th (green) = -38.5dB
18th (green) = -41.5dB
19th (green) = -44.0dB
20th (green) = -45.5dB

A letter to my friend: Composing with a Guitar and avoiding Dominant Chords

Our Tendancy

I think the kinds of chord progressions you (and I sometimes) tend to prefer are usually ambiguous about whether or not the music’s in a major key or in its relative minor (C vs Amin) and you (and I sometimes) tend to make chord changes that are “weak” by traditional/classical/theoretical/bullshit standards, but of course aren’t weak at all because they sound fine by modern rock-n-roll standards.  But I have some things to say about songwriting with guitars and stuff.

Disclaimer

BTW, none of this is a criticism of you.  I have a lot of the same tendencies. This is just an observation and me thinking out loud and wondering if you might benefit from my thoughts on this.  I avoid tritones as well and so does most hard rock music, at least in the guitar and bass.

Traditional Resolve

In music theory, things tend to get broken down into two-chord resolutions, how one chord leads to the next (which can then be seen as the first of the next set of two).

This is typically done via the Dominant chord(V or viiº) resolving to the Tonic (I), and that sequence is often preceded by the Predominant (IV or ii).  All of this centers around the Tritone, which essentially only occurs in one place in a Major key, between the 7th and 4th degree of a major key. G7, C… or Bº, C. (Dominant, Tonic), or with the Subdominant F, G7, C or F, Bº, C (F is IV, and is pretty much interchangeable with ii as in Dmin, G7, C or Dmin, Bº, C).  The reason the resolve is so strong has mostly to do with the fact that the two notes in the Tritone Interval in the Dominant (B & F) resolve by a half-step (“Leading Tones”) in two different directions! B is a leading tone of C (upward by a half-step) and F is a leading tone of E (going downward by a half-step)

(there are several other layers to this line of thinking, particularly “Tritone Substiution” and Dominants of chords besides the Tonic but the basic deal is that you have a lot of “Leading Tones” which are notes changing by a Half-step to the resolved or next chord, and a lot of chord changes that move up by 4th’s or down by 5ths)

Guitars

Tritones don’t sound very good to you and me in the lower notes of a guitar when the guitar is the majority of what you’re hearing.  You tend to avoid them and so do I.  I think the reason why is because they evoke the memory of Blues music when played in bigger chord forms (like an open G7 chord, a regular G with an F as it’s highest note), or they sound kind of like some sort of savage flamenco music when played in smaller chords (like a power chord with a flat 5th)…

The reference to Blues would likely steal the thunder of the kinds of mood you’re trying to keep (especially with your implied preference for modal/classical chord changes).  It’s as if the music suddenly yelled “Time to get funky” in the middle of a church hymn, or someone is interrupting “…And many more” as if after singing “Happy Birthday to You” or “…Oh great.  A barbershop Quartet!” And when the Tritone is voiced in a diminished power-chord (C, G flat, C) on the lower guitar strings it’s like “Is this a Primus song?”

Diatonic Vs Modal

When I first met you, your high school band’s chord progressions were mostly of a “Modal” nature, and that persists today.  I say Modal instead of “Diatonic” because you often don’t emphasize the Tonic.  But you do often stay within a key pretty rigidly.  This I think is because of guitars and the way rock-n-roll chord voicings are so commonly built. 1, 5, 1, 3, 5, 1 (E type Bar Chord), 1, 3, 5, 1, 3, 1 (G type Bar Chord) and 2nd Inversion Triads (5th at the bottom) 5, 1, 3…

This kind of locked-position playing (using the same basic left-hand shape, as in bar chords) leads to something that traditional music practice has  avoided for hundreds of years, the dreaded “Parallel Perfect Interval”  But in rock music, it’s almost the *only* thing we do! (power chords).

But your (and occasionally my) preference for Modal chord changes demonstrates a reverence for old time classical uptight properness. And it’s often a beautiful thing.

Counterpoint/Voice-Leading Vs Guitar Rock

There is a very old tradition of voice arranging called “Counterpoint” which is sort of a set of rules for arranging multiple voices.  One of the “Rules” of Counterpoint is to never allow Perfect Intervals(PU, P4, P5, P8) of any two voices to move in a parallel motion. If the first harmony was D over G, the next chord cannot be C over F.  Instead, you would need to invert one of the harmonies (F over C for instance). Notice, this pretty is much the exact opposite of what guitar’s easy movable chord system encourages.

I think Parallel Fifths/Fourths/Octaves are so horrible sounding in the classical sense that they are the reason that hard rock has such an edgy in-your-face sound.  Kind of like a middle finger to the guy with the white wig.  Very punk.  The Parallel Perfects (Octaves, 5ths and 4ths) dominate EVERYTHING and imply a strong melody, or even more so (or even worse), two melodies that are exactly the same, but a 5th/4th apart.

But with the approach of counterpoint, I think, the goal is more like a braid of tonality.  The root of a given chord, or its 5th isn’t the natural note to assume is the melody note.  Instead, the highest note you hear is often the melody.  Or rather, each part is an independent melody, just as strong as the others, but totally independent.  It’s very elegant and beautiful.

We are afraid of the Tritone because of the guitar (but it’s still happening)

So what’s a guy like you or me with a guitar and its typical rock voicings (power chords and bar chords) to do?  Avoid the Tritone!

Besides, we all know the Modal chord sequence by heart, at least subliminally, since we’re all trained in it from birth.  C, Dmin, Emin, F, G, Amin, Bº, C.  For example, when we hear Emin and Amin only, we pretty much already know we’re in C or G Major, or their relative Minor keys, although probably not A Minor because E, the 5 of Amin, would probably be played as E Major in the Key of A Minor.  There are only two places in a Major Key where two Minor Chords are a 5th/4th apart.  They are iii-vi and vi-ii.  So a key is implied with as little as two chords!

A lot of Rock and Folk (and other guitar-heavy) music songs never play the Diminished 5th that makes the V chord or viiº chord “Dominant,” at least not with guitars.  But that doesn’t mean it isn’t there.  Singers and synths and strings and melodies often play additional notes that turn the overall sound into more colorful chords 7th, Maj7, Min7, Sus, #9 Etc.

Other Instruments Broaden Our Creativity

It becomes really evident to me how restrictive songwriting is on a guitar, when I come up with something on piano, or just singing, or with intuitive synth layering, and then, take it back to the guitar and find myself using all sorts of strange and awkward guitar fingerings that, not only would I probably not have thought of, but if I did think of those chords while working solely on a guitar, I would have thought the chords/changes didn’t “work.”

And I really think this is because of all the “Parallel” 5ths, 4ths and Octaves (Perfect Intervals) that basic movable guitar chord forms yield.  For people like you and me, writing songs on a guitar basically guarantees bad form on a certain level: Less good Voice-leading and more avoiding Tritones and Dominants.

It’s all about voice-leading.  

In Jazz music, guitar players whom are playing with a group, are pretty much expected NOT to play the 5th of the chord (the root either for that matter).  They are supposed to focus on the tonal “skeleton” of the chord, which typically is the 3rd, 7th, 9th, Etc, and perhaps also the melody note, sometimes preferring that note on the top of the chord.  Good voicing also means making sure the leading tones (half steps) get utilized!

And in traditional orchestral music, there’s a lot of weight put on the importance of how independent voices move, especially to exploit leading tones.

Modal movements that sound strong on a guitar can be surprisingly not strong when expanded.

Moving from G to Emin, for instance, seems like a big move on a guitar, but in reality, only one note is changing.  The D in the G chord turns into an E. Movements of a 2nd, 4th, 5th or 7th make for better multi-melodies than 3rds and 6ths.  But the parallel motion of the Perfects (1st and 5th) in a 1-3 or 1-6 chord change hide how little is actually going on.  Not that it’s bad to do so, I’m just saying in a way, those weaker changes are variations of the same chord, even though to a lonely guitar, they sound pretty powerful.

Basically

I really think it’s valuable to understand the pitfalls of typical/easy guitar chord voicings.

A melody is a much better jumping off point for a composition than a guitar-only sequence made with parallel chord forms, unless they are particularly novel in some way.  Or an alien instrument that takes you out of the comfort zone of feeling like power chords are telling you what to do and what can be done.

 

DeltaLab Effectron, I, II, III ADM (Blue) Digital Delays From The 80’s (what I know so far)

First of all, I have an Effectron II ADM 1024 and it sounds Amazing, particularly the way it clips. I am on the hunt to figure out, if possible, how to retrofit these to slave to an external MIDI clock, or otherwise sync to a DAW.

I’m posting this because this has been quite a research project and if you’re trying to do the same thing, maybe you’ll have an easier time.

I got mine completely dead for ten bucks from a friend, popped the top off and got it to power up (I think it was a fuse… I’ll confirm that and update this)

Mine had dirty pots which I WD-40’ed and now sound pretty much perfect.  I think my input gain still crackles from time to time but I don’t ever need to adjust that after getting the primary level.  I also had to replace one Potentiometer since the knob shaft was broken off. I was able to do that easily.

Some stuff I learned:

  • The only place to get a schematic for the ADM 1024, unless DeltaLab writes me back with a copy, is HERE. For the sake of attribution, I’m going to leave this as an external link, but I have the files from that site saved and if that site ever goes down, I’ll upload them to my own site.  The schematics are pretty hard to read and I think there are some holes in the scans.  Better than nothing.
  • As far as I can tell, it’s totally possible and relatively easy to increase the maximum sample/delay length in these things just by adding a resistor or two and some inexpensive ram chips.  See HERE. On that page the author increases an ADM 1020’s max memory from around one second to around two seconds by adding three additional chips.  What I’m not sure of is if you can up it to four seconds by adding nine. The RAM, I’m pretty sure,  is MK4564-20.  There are some on eBay right now for about two dollars each. Found an Allegedly identical part for around eleven dollars each, so maybe they no longer get made.
  • [quote from same site:] DeltaLab used a special type of Adaptive Delta Modulation (ADM), which they continuously improoved over the years. You might take a look at US-Patents #31720, #4190801, 4254502, #4305050, #4313204 and #4462106. This is much more sophisticated than the cheap ADM projects that were published in various magazines as musical diy projects. (Elrad Delta-Delay, and others) The great thing is that the patent text even has component values shown !

  • I’m currently in discussion with someone over at Molten Voltage about whether or not one of their PedalSync products can be used to make my ADM 1024 slave to MIDI Clock from my computer.  Probably their MV-64. I will update this if I get anywhere.
  • I’m also currently talking to some nice stranger via the diystompboxes.com forums about the same thing.
  • [On that forum “q_u_e_s_t said:]…the clock comes out on pin6 of IC38 (4528B) [see above schematic link]. it is a 0 to 12v digital signal varying from 250kHz to 1MHz. it has a fixed pulse width of 0.5?s for the high period, and the low period varies in length to make up the remaining time… [and]…the way this delay pedal works is very similar to BBD. basically, BBD is a long line of buckets that hold an analog voltage level. but, in this device, its a long line of buckets that hold a digital voltage level. as a result, it needs to be clocked faster, as 1 bit of data (1 logic level) doesnt carry as much information as 1 analog bucket. so you need a bunch of digital buckets to get read in the same amount of time. so, what this means for their kit, is wether or not it can clock fast enough. ask them what the highest clock rate on the kit is. it needs to go to 1MHz…

Missing MAS Plug-Ins ParaEQ & MW Equalizer in MOTU Digital Performer (DP5.13))

Here’s what I did that finally solved this problem after 2 full days of suffering and searching for answers.

 

  1. I uninstalled the DP software reverse-incrementally, starting with 5.13 in UNINSTALL mode, then DP 5.1 and finally the original DP 5 Installer on the CD.
  2. I repeated the same process AGAIN, but this time selected “MyHardDrive” rather than the “Applications Folder” as the target install directory, again selecting UNINSTALL rather than Easy Install
  3. I Manually deleted all remaining Plug-Ins that came with DP from username/Library/Audio/Plug-Ins/MAS/
  4. I manually moved my remaining [dot-bundle] .bundle files (other MAS plugins that didn’t come with DP) from my user directory to my hard-drive directory.  Originally, some were at UserName/Library/Audio/Plug-Ins/MAS/  and I moved all those files to HardDriveName/Library/Audio/Plug-Ins/MAS/
  5. I manually deleted the folder called MAS from username/Library/Audio/Plug-Ins/
  6. I manually I deleted all files from both the user and hard-drive versions of Library/Preferences/ that had “motu” in their names, all “.plist” files
  7. I manually Deleted a folder called “Digital Performer™” from UserName/Library/Preferences/
  8. I manually Deleted  HardDrive/Library/Audio/presets/Digital Performer/
  9. I manually Deleted the Auth-DigitalPerformer 5.0 file from my hard-drive via the Terminal (it’s an invisible file)
  10. I manually deleted any/all extra/unnecessary MOTU apps/utilities from my Applications Folder… I had some out-dated FireWire Audio shit and some Un-Needed PCI shit.
  11. I re-booted from MAC OSX CD and REPAIRED PERMISSIONS (which incidentally were all good)
  12. After rebooting, I re-installed MOTU DP5, which does not run on my Leopard machine as version 5.0 (Unexpectedly Quits Etc)
  13. Installed the MOTU 5.1 Update
  14. Installed the MOTU 5.13 Update
  15. My Equalizer  Plugins are back.
  16. Repaired Permissions (and the plugins are still back) DP is back to normal, at least for now.
Let me know if this solution doesn’t work for you.  I deleted so much shit manually that I may have left something out.   48 Hours of this kind of hell will do that to a guy.

Digital Permormer Can’t Save After Hard-Drive Clone/Migration

NOTE: the following refers to DP 5.1 on a Mac with OS 10.4.11… If you have a different version of OS X or if you’re running an older version of DP, things might be a little different

After cloning my drive with Carbon Copy Cloner and migrating to the clone, I found that Digital Performer wasn’t able to save files! Error Says:

An Error occurred while writing to the disk. The file [name] was not saved. This file was created in a later version of Digital Performer and cannot be opened in this version. Try to save your file on another disk or folder, or with a different name.

Oh no!

picture-2.png

A little digging found me these Instructions from MOTU but they are slightly incorrect, at least they were for me.

The fix is to delete an invisible file called Auth-DigitalPerformer 5.0 from your Hard Drive’s root directory.

If you’re not comfortable doing things in the Terminal, File Buddy is a great app for this sort of thing. It’s like a souped-up Finder allows you to work with invisible files and do all kinds of other advanced things with the stuff on your Mac. It’s a very useful program but it does cost like $40 bucks.

A free Applications that will get the job done just as well is called Visibility and it’s made by a company called Zevrix Solutions. Download it, install it, launch it, click on Show Invisible Files, the Finder will relaunch, then you will see the file called Auth-DigitalPerformer 5.0 in your Root directory. Trash it and DP should be happy again. Afterward you can use Visibility to put the Finder back to normal.

Do be really careful not to move or delete any of the other invisible files. They’re hidden from you for a reason.

###

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